Podcast: The “Lush Garden” of Andalusian Music by Dr. Carl Davila

Biography Dr. Carl Davila holds a PhD in Arabic Studies from Yale University (2006). He lived in Fez off and on for nearly three years in the early 2000s and has visited Morocco frequently since then. Being the first scholar to write extensively in English on the Andalusian music in Morocco, he has published two … Read more Podcast: The “Lush Garden” of Andalusian Music by Dr. Carl Davila


Podcast: Modern Art and Architecture in Morocco in the Aftershock of the 1960 Agadir Earthquake by Riad Kherdeen

Photograph of the Agadir central post office, designed by Jean-François Zevaco in 1963. The photo comes from Thierry Nadau’s chapter in Architecture française d’outer-mer.

Biography Riad Kherdeen studies global modern art and architecture, with a focus on the region of West Asia/Middle East and North Africa (MENA). He is working on a doctoral dissertation project on modernist art and architecture in Morocco related to the Agadir earthquake of 1960 titled “Spectral Modernisms: Decolonial Aesthetics and Haunting in the Aftershock … Read more Podcast: Modern Art and Architecture in Morocco in the Aftershock of the 1960 Agadir Earthquake by Riad Kherdeen


MAPPING MEMORIES, CREATING HISTORY: THE TANGIER AMERICAN LEGATION, by Emily Albrecht

Abstract:  The Tangier American Legation hosted the U.S. Legation and Consulate for 140 years, and was the formal conduit for diplomatic and consular relations between the United States and Morocco. After the diplomatic move to Rabat after Morocco’s independence in 1956, the building operated as a Foreign Service Institute and, later, as a Peace Corps … Read more MAPPING MEMORIES, CREATING HISTORY: THE TANGIER AMERICAN LEGATION, by Emily Albrecht


Podcast: Roots and Traces of Contemporary Cultural Life in Tangier

By: George Bajalia and Aida Alami In this discussion at Youmein 2021: Roots and Traces, anthropologist George Bajalia and journalist Aida Alami explore the roots and traces of contemporary cultural life in Tangier, especially as they relate to northern Morocco’s border regions.  From questions of diversity and difference to the roots of present debates around … Read more Podcast: Roots and Traces of Contemporary Cultural Life in Tangier


Engendering Inclusive Politics: Gender Quotas in Morocco’s Legislatures

Abstract: In response to the February 20 movement, the Moroccan government passed electoral laws that institutionalized and expanded gender quotas at the national and local levels, enabling women to win an unprecedented number of seats in the 2015 and 2016 elections. Delana’s Fulbright research examines how reserved seats in the House of Representatives and communal … Read more Engendering Inclusive Politics: Gender Quotas in Morocco’s Legislatures


Lawrence Peskin Podcast: James Simpson — The First American Consul to Tangier

Lawrence Peskin, a history professor at Morgan State University in Baltimore, is in Tangier to research the life of James Simpson, America’s first consul to Morocco (1797-1820). He is doing so as part of a larger book project that traces the development of the Early National American community in the Mediterranean region by studying the lives and networks of three consuls. In addition to Simpson, he is studying Robert Montgomery of Alicante, Spain and Thomas Appleton of Livorno, Italy.
In addition to the many sources in the library at TALIM, he has benefitted from the opportunity to be able to walk around Tangier and understand the local geography. In doing so he has struggled to identify the remains of the 18th and early 19th century town and, particularly, the various consular houses in which members of the roughly 150-member European community resided.
In the pod cast and in a more detailed blog post he discusses his efforts to find the location of the first American consular house (before the current American Legation) and Simpson’s country villa, “Mount Washington.”

Read moreLawrence Peskin Podcast: James Simpson — The First American Consul to Tangier


Johanna Sluiter Podcast: Building Habitat — The Atelier des Bâtisseurs in North Africa and Beyond


Johanna Sluiter is a PhD Candidate at the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU where she is writing a dissertation on the Atelier des Bâtisseurs and the development of habitat in post-war architecture. She is currently an associate researcher at the École Normale Supérieure d’Architecture Belleville in Paris and a Chester Dale Fellow at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Read moreJohanna Sluiter Podcast: Building Habitat — The Atelier des Bâtisseurs in North Africa and Beyond


James Miller: Moroccan-American Archaeological Project of Ancient Sijilmasa (Podcast)

On Monday, September 30 2019, James Miller spoke with TALIM Director John Davison about the joint Moroccan-American archaeological project at the site of ancient Sijilmasa and the publication of book, “The Last Civilized Place: Sijilmasa and Its Saharan Destiny” (University of Texas Press, 2015). “The Last Civilized Place,” written by Miller and Project Director Ronald Messier, recounts the story of the Project, its archaeological findings, and places Sijilmasa in the context of Moroccan and Islamic history, revealing the 1000-year history of the caravan center as a focus of trans-Saharan trade and focal point of dynastic change.

Read moreJames Miller: Moroccan-American Archaeological Project of Ancient Sijilmasa (Podcast)


US – Morocco Relations

morocco_usThe first nation to publicly recognize U.S. independence following the Revolutionary War was Morocco. Muhammad III, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams signed the Moroccan-American Treaty of Friendship in 1786; congress approved it the next year.

This treaty, which was proposed by the Moroccan sultan while the U.S. was still at war with Britain, also pertained to trade. As a result, not only did it establish alliance between the nations, and not only did it aid recognition of U.S. independence by other countries, but the treaty also helped development of commerce for a very young United States, too.

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CFP-Mediterranean Crossroads: Spanish-Maghribi Relations in Past and Present

contentpages_topAnnual Conference 2016
Mediterranean Crossroads: Spanish-Maghribi Relations in Past and Present

May 14-15, 2016 at the Legation

Submissions Deadline January 10, 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS: (Spanish-pdf) (Arabic-pdf) (English-pdf)

Map_of_Morocco_and_Iberia_(1783)We are seeking participants for the 2016 AIMS Annual Conference Mediterranean Crossroads: Spanish-Maghribi Relations in Past and Present. This interdisciplinary conference will take place in Tangier, Morocco, on 14 and 15 May 2016. The aim of the conference is to reconceptualize the relations between North Africa and the Iberian peninsula during the modern era (18th-21st century). Despite the significance of this geographical nexus centered on the Strait of Gibraltar, contemporary scholarship on this pivotal topic is underdeveloped and deficient, creating absences where there should be narratives of engagement and connectivity. Some of the questions we shall be asking are: What are the various aspects of this shared relationship, what are the sources of its specificity, and how has it shaped ideas and events in the western Mediterranean historically and today? Our objective is to deploy an array of methodologies to elucidate new ways of thinking about the region as a crossroads of human activity.

Read moreCFP-Mediterranean Crossroads: Spanish-Maghribi Relations in Past and Present